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Professor Ranu Jung named American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering Fellow


Jung_portrait-240x300Ranu Jung, professor and chair of FIU’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been named a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

The AIMBE citation recognized Jung “for her outstanding contributions to developing novel physiology-based orthopedic devices, and for fostering academic and industrial interactions to advance neuro-engineering.”

Jung is one of 70 individuals selected to be a member of the 2013 AIMBE College of Fellows, a group that represents the top 2 percent of the most accomplished medical and biological engineers. She will be recognized at the AIMBE annual conference in Washington, D.C., Feb. 17-19.

“I am honored to be elected to the College of Fellows of AIMBE,” Jung said. “It has been a thrill to work in this exciting field of neural engineering as new technologies emerge into clinical practice, and I have been fortunate to work with great mentors, colleagues and students. I always remember that when I asked my doctoral advisor when my doctorate would be completed, he explained, ‘When you have created something beautiful.’ I always keep that thought with me, and I feel honored to be in this great community of people creating knowledge and beautiful things.”

Jung, who holds the Wallace H. Coulter Eminent Scholars Chair of Biomedical Engineering, is the director of the Adaptive Neural Systems Laboratory at FIU, where engineers and scientists are designing and developing technology to offset the effects of limb amputation, orthopedic injury and disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. By applying a multifaceted approach, the laboratory investigates the effects of trauma and disorders of the nervous system to replace damaged or lost functionality or to repair the system using advanced adaptive devices and therapeutic techniques.

Jung is a leader in the rapidly expanding fields of neural engineering and computational neuroscience. With a two-decade record of competitive federal funding, she has been a leader in establishing academic-clinical-industrial partnerships in neural engineering and computational neuroscience research. Jung has been an entrepreneur and co-founded Advensys LLC, a small business R&D company.

Jung is the past-president of the International Organization for Computational Neurosciences Inc. She is actively engaged in the development of neurotechnology that is inspired by biology, is adaptive and could be used to promote adaptation in the nervous system to overcome neurological disability or trauma. Of special interest to her are biomimetic and biohybrid living-hardware systems for sensorimotor control, and in 2011 published an edited book, “Biohybrid Systems: Nerves, Interfaces and Machines” (Wiley-VCH).

Jung’s recent honors include the Florida Board of Governors’ New Florida Scholars Boost Award and the Florida International University 2012 Top Scholar Award. She has served on several scientific advisory and expert review panels for the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. National Institutes of Health and several international institutions.

Jung’s current research program, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, is focused on the development, design and delivery of novel neural interfaces to prostheses for upper limb amputees.

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