Articles by: Chrystian Tejedor

A team led by chemistry professor Raphael Raptis developed an iron-based material that can distinguish chiral molecules that occur naturally in right- and left-handed forms. In the case of pharmaceuticals, this could be one way to ensure toxic versions of molecules are not included in a formula.

Discovery could be game-changer for pharmaceuticals

Manufacturing drugs may one day become more efficient, courtesy of a recent discovery by FIU researchers. Until today, platinum was […]

FIU marine sciences professor Heather Bracken-Grissom

Crabs, lobsters and shrimp now have a family tree dating 500 million years

Researchers have for the first time traced the roots of crabs, lobsters and shrimp to create the family tree of […]

Subtler forms of harassment erode women’s feelings of legitimacy in physics

Subtler forms of harassment erode women’s feelings of legitimacy in physics

Sexual harassment is another barrier women in STEM must overcome, according to a new study. In a survey of undergraduate […]

J. Aaron Hogan

Ph.D. student awarded grant to conduct research at national lab

An FIU student is one of only 70 graduate students chosen to participate in an exclusive U.S. Department of Energy […]

Rebel with a cause

Rebel with a cause

A little rebellion does a lot to improve education. James Burns learned this simple truth 22 years ago. It was […]

Researchers tested the effects of elevated salinity and increased phosphorus on sawgrasses to see how marshes would respond to future sea level rise.

Sea level rise could make plants bigger. Then it may kill them.

Larger plants may be the first sign sea levels are rising in the Everglades, according to an FIU study. Beneath […]

Our researchers can’t work without…

Our researchers can’t work without…

Researchers go into the field sometimes with just a backpack, other times with suitcases full of gear. Some tools can […]

Meet Eugenia walkerae, a newly named plant species from Anguilla

Meet Eugenia walkerae, a newly named plant species from Anguilla

Once relegated to the dustbin of history, a Caribbean plant now has a name and a family. Eugenia walkerae, lifelong […]

Worried about traveling with your kids over the holidays? Read this first.

Worried about traveling with your kids over the holidays? Read this first.

A little preparation can spare parents who travel with their children – and those around them – from feeling the […]

Nature offers most cost-effective solution for climate change

Nature offers most cost-effective solution for climate change

U.S. wetlands, forests and agricultural lands could absorb traffic emissions Restoring seagrass meadows, mangrove forests and salt marshes could play […]

FBI forensics hits Hollywood speed, researcher says

FBI forensics hits Hollywood speed, researcher says

If you believe everything you see on TV, forensic scientists can wrap up a case in an hour. That doesn’t […]

Adding sand to beaches is a short-term way of fighting erosion. New research suggests that nourishing beaches may become too expensive in the long run.

Hurricanes remind us sand is not a renewable resource

As beachside communities begin rebuilding in the wake of two catastrophic hurricane impacts on the United States, they should ask […]

Hurricane Michael approaches Florida's Panhandle. Photo Courtesy: NOAA

What hurricanes mean for red tide

Hurricane Michael is likely to affect the Florida red tide bloom. What’s not yet clear is how. Michael was a […]

Panel explores effects of red tide on Florida

Panel explores effects of red tide on Florida

Red tide continues to be a source of concern for Florida, according to FIU experts. The harmful algal bloom that […]

Naples, USA - April 29, 2018: Florida pink, red and orange sunset in gulf of Mexico with sign for red tide dead fish algae bloom warning

FIU expert panel to discuss Florida red tide

The confirmation of a red tide in the waters off Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties – a rare occurrence on […]